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Estonia

The current time in Estonia
2:11:25 pm
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Estonia, formally the Republic of Estonia, is a country by the Baltic Sea in Northern Europe. It is bordered to the north by the Gulf of Finland across from Finland, to the west by the sea across from Sweden, to the south by Latvia, and to the east by Lake Peipus and Russia. The territory of Estonia consists of the mainland, the larger islands of Saaremaa and Hiiumaa, and over 2,200 other islands and islets on the eastern coast of the Baltic Sea, covering a total area of 45,339 square kilometres (17,505 sq mi). The capital city Tallinn and Tartu are the two largest urban areas of the country. The Estonian language is the autochthonous and the official language of Estonia; it is the first language of the majority of its population, as well as the world's second most spoken Finnic language.

The land of what is now modern Estonia has been inhabited by Homo sapiens since at least 9,000 BC. The medieval indigenous population of Estonia was one of the last "pagan" civilisations in Europe to adopt Christianity following the Papal-sanctioned Livonian Crusade in the 13th century. After centuries of successive rule by the Teutonic Order, Denmark, Sweden, and the Russian Empire, a distinct Estonian national identity began to emerge in the mid-19th century. This culminated in the 24 February 1918 Estonian Declaration of Independence from the then warring Russian and German Empires. After the end of World War I, in the 1918–1920 War of Independence, Estonians were able to repel the Bolshevik Russian invasion and successfully defended their newborn freedom. Democratic throughout most of the interwar period, Estonia declared neutrality at the outbreak of World War II, but the country was repeatedly contested, invaded and occupied, first by Stalinist Soviet Union in 1940, then by Nazi Germany in 1941, and ultimately reoccupied in 1944 by, and annexed into, the USSR as an administrative subunit (Estonian SSR). After the loss of its de facto independence to the Soviet Union, Estonia's de jure state continuity was preserved by diplomatic representatives and the government-in-exile. Following the bloodless Estonian "Singing Revolution" of 1988–1990, the nation's de facto independence was restored on 20 August 1991.

Estonia is a developed country, with a high-income advanced economy, ranking very highly in the Human Development Index. The sovereign state of Estonia is a democratic unitary parliamentary republic, administratively subdivided into 15 maakond (counties). With a population of just over 1.3 million, it is one of the least populous members of the European Union, the Eurozone, the OECD, the Schengen Area, and NATO. Estonia is nowadays often considered to be one of the three "Baltic countries" or "Baltic states" — a geopolitical grouping which also includes Latvia and Lithuania. Estonia has consistently ranked highly in international rankings for quality of life, education, press freedom, digitalisation of public services and the prevalence of technology companies.

The Importance of Knowing the Time in Estonia

Make sure to find the time to make sure it is best. Not all clocks tell the time correctly. Depending on the location of your cell phone, your time could be off for as much as 5 minutes or more. Looking for more data on this city? Look below for data such as population and more.

How to tell the time

You can use a traditional analog clock, your cell phone, or even a sundial to tell the time.

Clocks work by logging track of the number of rotations of a particular wheel or spring. As the wheel or spring turns, it moves a gear that is connected to the hands of the clock. The speed at which the wheel or spring turns is regulated by a pendulum or weight, which swings back and forth as the clock ticks.

How to read a clock

Assuming you already know how to tell the time on a traditional clock face, reading a digital clock is easy and straightforward. All you need to do is identify the numbers on the clock face and read them as if they were on a traditional clock face.

For example, if the digital clock reads "12:15," then it is 12:15pm.

Digital vs. Analog clocks

Digital clocks display the time as a number, typically in hours, minutes, and seconds. Analog clocks display the time using hands on a clock face.

There are positives and negatives to each type of clock. Digital clocks are easy to read at a glance and can be very accurate. However, they can also be harder to set and may require batteries. Analog clocks are often more aesthetically pleasing and can be operated without batteries. However, they can be more difficult to read at a glance and may not be as accurate as digital clocks.

How to tell time without a clock

In order to tell time without a clock, you can use a variety of methods that only require the sun and shadows. One method is to find a stick and put it in the ground so that the shadow is cast on the ground. The length of the shadow will indicate what time it is. Another way is to use your hand to estimate how long the shadow is. You can do this by holding your hand up to the sun and making a fist. The space between your thumb and first finger will be about 15 minutes on a sundial. You can also use your watch or phone to find out what time it is by using an online world clock like this one.

Learn more about Estonia

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