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Tunisia

The current time in Tunisia
1:04:45 pm
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Tunisia, officially the Republic of Tunisia, is the northernmost country in Africa. It is a part of the Maghreb region of North Africa, bordered by Algeria to the west and southwest, Libya to the southeast, and the Mediterranean Sea to the north and east. It features the archaeological sites of Carthage dating back to the 9th century BC, as well as the Great Mosque of Kairouan. Known for its ancient architecture, souks and blue coasts, it covers 163,610 km2 (63,170 sq mi), and has a population of 12.1 million. It contains the eastern end of the Atlas Mountains and the northern reaches of the Sahara desert; much of its remaining territory is arable land. Its 1,300 km (810 mi) of coastline include the African conjunction of the western and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Basin. Tunisia is home to Africa's northernmost point, Cape Angela; and its capital and largest city is Tunis, which is located on its northeastern coast, and lends the country its name.

Beginning in early antiquity, Tunisia was inhabited by the indigenous Berbers. Phoenicians began to arrive in the 12th century BC, establishing several settlements, of which Carthage emerged as the most powerful by the 7th century BC. Carthage was a major mercantile empire and a military rival to the Roman Republic until 146 BC, when it was defeated by the Romans who occupied Tunisia for most of the next 800 years. The Romans introduced Christianity and left architectural legacies like the Amphitheatre of El Jem. In the 7th century AD, Arab Muslims conquered all of Tunisia (finally succeeding in 697 after several attempts starting in 647) and settled with their tribes and families, brought Islam and Arab culture to the local inhabitants, and since then Arabs became the majority of the population. Then, in 1546, the Ottoman Empire established control there, holding sway for over 300 years, until 1881, when the French conquered Tunisia. In 1956, Tunisia gained independence as the Tunisian Republic under the leadership of Habib Bourguiba with the help of activists such as Chedly Kallala, Farhat Hached and Salah Ben Youssef. Today, Tunisia's culture and identity are rooted in this centuries-long intersection of different cultures and ethnicities.

In 2011, the Tunisian Revolution, which was triggered by dissatisfaction with the lack of freedom and democracy under the 24-year rule of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, overthrew his regime and catalyzed the broader Arab Spring movement across the region. Free multiparty parliamentary elections were held shortly thereafter; the country again voted for parliament on 26 October 2014, and for president on 23 November 2014. After the 2022 constitutional referendum, Tunisia became a unitary presidential representative democratic republic. From 2014 to 2020, it was considered the only democratic state in the Arab World, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit's Democracy Index, and was rated a hybrid regime in the 2021 Index. It is one of the few countries in Africa ranking high in the Human Development Index, with one of the highest per capita incomes on the continent, ranking 129th in GDP per capita income.

The official language of Tunisia is Modern Standard Arabic. The vast majority of Tunisia's population is Arab and Muslim. Vernacular Tunisian Arabic is the most spoken, and French also serves as an administrative and educational language in some contexts, but it has no official status.

Tunisia is well integrated into the international community. It is a member of the United Nations, La Francophonie, the Arab League, the OIC, the African Union, the COMESA, the Non-Aligned Movement, the International Criminal Court, and the Group of 77, among others. It maintains close economic and political relations with some European countries, particularly with France, and Italy, due to their geographical proximity. Tunisia also has an association agreement with the European Union and has attained the status of a major non-NATO ally of the United States.

The Importance of Knowing the Time in Tunisia

Make sure to look the time to make sure it is accurate. Not all clocks tell the time correctly. Depending on the location of your cell phone, your time could be off for as much as 5 minutes or more. Looking for more information on this area? Look below for information such as population and more.

How to tell the time

You can use a antique analog clock, your cell phone, or even a sundial to tell the time.

Watches work by keeping track of the number of rotations of a particular wheel or spring. As the wheel or spring turns, it moves a gear that is connected to the hands of the clock. The speed at which the wheel or spring turns is regulated by a pendulum or weight, which swings back and forth as the clock ticks.

How to read a clock

Assuming you already know how to tell the time on a old school clock face, reading a digital clock is easy and straightforward. All you need to do is identify the numbers on the clock face and read them as if they were on a traditional clock face.

For example, if the digital clock reads "12:15," then it is 12:15pm.

Digital vs. Analog clocks

Digital clocks display the time as a number, typically in hours, minutes, and seconds. Analog clocks display the time using hands on a clock face.

There are pros and negatives to each type of clock. Digital clocks are easy to read at a glance and can be very accurate. However, they can also be harder to set and may require batteries. Analog clocks are often more aesthetically pleasing and can be operated without batteries. However, they can be more difficult to read at a glance and may not be as accurate as digital clocks.

How to tell time without a watch

In order to tell time without a clock, you can use a alot of methods that only require the sun and shadows. One way is to find a stick and put it in the ground so that the shadow is cast on the ground. The length of the shadow will indicate what time it is. Another method is to use your hand to estimate how long the shadow is. You can do this by holding your hand up to the sun and making a fist. The space between your thumb and first finger will be about 15 minutes on a sundial. You can also use your watch or phone to find out what time it is by using an online world clock like this one.

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